thejudge:

kaname-madoka:

(◕‿‿◕✿◕✿)(◕‿◕✿) FIRI IEDNYL (◕‿◕✿) (◕‿‿◕✿FR‿◕✿IEN ◕DLY ✿) REMINDER FRIENDLY (◕‿◕✿) reminder freminder that FRIENDLY REMINder friend ly re mider that it’s okay to ‿◕✿ friend

ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ MEME FRIED DINNER ヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノຈ༽ FRIEヽ༼ຈل͜ຈ༽ノ D FRENCH MEME NUGGETヽ༼ຈل͜༼ຈຈ༽ノ

(via cosimaohara)

grawly:

i dont even interpret “uwu” as a smiley i just read it as “oo woo”

(via valamaldoran)

#emoticons  #uwu  

Is there a better way of showing a text message in a film? How about the internet? Even though we’re well into the digital age, film is still ineffective at depicting the world we live in. Maybe the solution lies not in content, but in form.

This is a really interesting analysis of how electronically-mediated communication is being portrayed on film. BBC Sherlock probably does it the best in its portrayal of text messages on screen, using a font that fits the cinematography of the show while framing shots to include the text fluidly. (via io9)

Were he still alive, the cultural-studies scholar Raymond Williams might have counted “friend,” “cloud,” “platform,” “algorithm,” “server,” and “app” among today’s “keywords”—clusters of terms whose definitional shifts register where social change is “active and pressing.” Keywords remind us of the degree to which the story of technology is a human one, grounded not only in the calculi of science and engineering but also in the welter of everyday talk.

mogmo:

i’m so happy to live in an age in which journalists argue that emoji ‘lack the wit and imagination of memes’

(via valamaldoran)

We have lost phone conversations, because talking on cell phones is no fun at all, and it’s harder than texting or typing. I do think we’ve lost that, but we’ve gained a lot with the internet. I feel like the internet has turned us all into letter writers. I think of my mother when I was a kid, she never wrote down anything but a grocery list. People didn’t write, because you’d call. Why would you write anything? But now we’re all writers.

So when people complain about grammar and punctuation, I think it isn’t that our grammar and punctuation have gotten worse, but that it used to be that only writers wrote. Only people who were in education wrote, but now we all write: we all text, we all post. I feel like we’ve lost phones but we’ve gained this whole different type of correspondence that hasn’t existed since the age of letter writing.

(via jon-snow)

chead asked: hey what's up with the "!" in fandoms? i.e. "fat!<thing>" just curious thaxxx <3

nentuaby:

hosekisama:

michaelblume:

molly-ren:

stevita:

molly-ren:

molly-ren:

I have asked this myself in the past and never gotten an answer.

Maybe today will be the day we are both finally enlightened.

woodsgotweird said: man i just jumped on the bandwagon because i am a sheep. i have no idea where it came from and i ask myself this question all the time

Maybe someone made a typo and it just got out of hand?

I kinda feel like panic!at the disco started the whole exclamation point thing and then it caught on around the internet, but maybe they got it from somewhere else, IDK.

The world may never know…

Maybe it’s something mathematical?

I’ve been in fandom since *about* when Panic! formed and the adjective!character thing was already going strong, pretty sure it predates them.

It’s a way of referring to particular variations of (usually) a character — dark!Will, junkie!Sherlock, et cetera. I have suspected for a while that it originated from some archive system that didn’t accommodate spaces in its tags, so to make common interpretations/versions of the characters searchable, people started jamming the words together with an infix.

(Lately I’ve seen people use the ! notation when the suffix isn’t the full name, but is actually the second part of a common fandom portmanteau. This bothers me a lot but it happens, so it’s worth being aware of.)

"Bang paths" (! is called a "bang"when not used for emphasis) were the first addressing scheme for email, before modern automatic routing was set up. If you wanted to write a mail to the Steve here in Engineering, you just wrote "Steve" in the to: field and the computer sent it to the local account named Steve. But if it was Steve over in the physics department you wrote it to phys!Steve; the computer sent it to the "phys" computer, which sent it in turn to the Steve account. To get Steve in the Art department over at NYU, you wrote NYU!art!Steve- your computer sends it to the NYU gateway computer sends it to the "art" computer sends it to the Steve account. Etc. ("Bang"s were just chosen because they were on the keyboard, not too visually noisy, and not used for a huge lot already).

It became pretty standard jargon, as I understand, to disambiguate when writing to other humans. First phys!Steve vs the Steve right next to you, just like you were taking to the machine, then getting looser (as jargon does) to reference, say, bearded!Steve vs bald!Steve.

So I’m guessing alternate character version tags probably came from that.

  • Person: the doge meme sucks.
  • Doge:
  • Doge:
  • Doge: wow. Such attacked. Came out for good time. Much honest.
#doge  #memes  

allofthefeelings:

I just came out to have a good time and I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now is finally on knowyourmeme, with links for the origin, and I feel a palpable sense of relief at seeing this mystery solved.

(via lemonyandbeatrice)

#memes